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Hazard alert - Blade breaks loose in chipper

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A steel blade broke loose in a chipper, penetrated the flywheel housing and was ejected at speed. The blade weighed 1.5 kg and could have inflicted fatal injury. Goggles worn by the operator saved her eyes from probable blinding by steel splinters thrown out of the feed chute.

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Choosing the right guard

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Choosing the right guard for the machine will create a physical barrier between a worker and the dangerous parts of the machinery. Use this flowchart to help you identify the right guard for your machine.

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COSHH Essentials E-tool

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This link will take you to the UK Health and Safety Executive’s COSHH Essentials E-tool.
This tool provides advice to workplaces on how to control exposure to hazardous substances for a range of common workplace tasks and chemicals.

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Design process examples

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Many hazards can be eliminated through machine design. Below are examples of how to reduce or remove hazards that exist at different stages of the machine’s life cycle. Consider how these might apply to machines you are purchasing or modifying.

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Hazard checklist

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The first step in the hazard management process is to identify hazards – anything that could injure or harm someone. Do a workplace inspection to identify all machinery used. The following hazard checklist is an example of a way in which to identify possible machinery hazards in your workplace.

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Hierarchy of controls

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If you’ve identified and assessed a hazard as significant, it must be controlled using the hierarchy of controls. A significant hazard should be eliminated, if it can’t then isolated, and if that isn’t practicable, controls should be put in place to minimise the hazard.
If it is not a significant hazard the employer must still take all practicable steps to ensure the equipment is safe for employees to use.

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Keeping workers engaged

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Run a series of talking point sessions relating to different machine hazard topics. The following talking points are suggestions – please adapt and change the questions/topics based on the needs of your business.

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Resource manual handling in the manufactoring industry

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“Manufacturing” covers a wide range of industries including: textiles, clothing, footwear, motor vehicle assembly, food processing, pulp and paper, wood products and metal products.
The most common manual handling injuries that occur in manufacturing industries are: sprains and strains, back injuries, foot injuries and abdominal hernias. Back pain is a common experience. It can be caused or aggravated by manual handling activities at work, and body postures that are adopted during work.

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Manufacturing in New Zealand

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Manufacturing is vital to New Zealand’s economy. It is the largest single sector of the economy, accounting for 13% of GDP in 2012, with sales over $40 billion. Manufacturing is the fourth largest employer, with around 240,000 people (238,499, as at June 2014) employed in manufacturing. This is around 10% of New Zealand’s workforce.

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Noise in manufacturing

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Many manufacturing processes, machinery and equipment produce high noise levels, which can lead to hearing problems. This fact sheet outlines ways you can manage noise at your workplace.

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Hazard alert - Quarry crusher fatality

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A quarry crusher operator was killed when the primary plant stacker conveyor belt that he was standing on suddenly ran backwards due to a component failure in the head drum.

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Regular monitoring and review process

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Once control measures are in place, they must be regularly monitored and reviewed. The following tools provide a range of ideas about how to involve your employees to regularly monitor and review control measures.

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Respirator selection tool

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A UK based tool has been developed to help workplaces find the right respirator for their employees and help manage their respiratory protection programme. The tool was developed by the Health and Safety Executive, NHS Health Scotland and Healthy Working Lives (HWL). This tool can be used by New Zealand workplaces to assist in choosing and managing the correct respiratory protection, however there are some important points listed below that you need to read and consider before using this tool for your workplace.

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Respiratory protective equipment - Advice for employees

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This information is for employees who use respiratory protective equipment (RPE) at work. RPE is a type of personal protective equipment (PPE) that protects the wearer from breathing in hazardous substances.

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Respiratory protective equipment - Advice for employers

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As an employer you must provide your employees with respiratory protective equipment (RPE) when there is an airborne hazardous substance that can’t be eliminated or isolated. Hazardous substances in the air can be in dust, mist, vapour or gas form. You must take all practicable steps to make sure that your employees are provided with, and have access to and use suitable RPE. This factsheet covers some factors to consider when using RPE in your workplace and explains the requirement to monitor the health of employees when RPE is used to minimise a hazard.

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Risk rating table

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Every identified hazard must be assessed to see if it is a significant hazard – something that could cause serious harm. Assessing risk is not an absolute science – it’s a ‘best estimate’ made on the basis of available information – this involves including all relevant people, including workers, in the process. A Risk Rating Table, like the one below, can help you to assess the likelihood and consequence of injury or harm.

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Safe system of work checklist

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A safe system of work means the steps taken to minimise the risk of the hazard when completing a specific task or set of tasks. Use this checklist when developing your safe systems of work.

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Sample job safety analysis

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Documenting your chosen control measures helps show you have met your legal obligations. Keep records to track what has been done and what is planned; effective record-keeping can save time and money.

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Hazard alert - Stacking super sacks

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A plastic injection moulder operator was killed when a 1100kg synthetic super sack containing texPET pellets fell on top of him.

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Hazard alert - Steel splinters cause eye injuries

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A quarry worker was struck in the eye by steel splinters during maintenance work on a rock crusher. The fragments were surgically removed requiring two operations.

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Welding and local exhaust ventilation

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As an employer you have a responsibility to protect your employees from exposure
to hazardous fumes. Local exhaust ventilation (LEV) is an engineering control commonly used for welding. When designed, used and maintained properly it is an effective control measure.

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Workplace traffic management

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Moving vehicles and equipment on manufacturing sites can be fatal if not used correctly and safely. Known as mobile plant, they have the potential to cause serious injury or kill someone by striking them or colliding with other vehicles or equipment.

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Airborne contaminants assessment tool

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Hazard management systems assessment tool

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Machines - Assessment tool

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Noise - Assessment tool

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Workplace transport - Assessment tool

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The absolutely essential Health and Safety Toolkit - for manufacturing

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The absolutely essential Health and Safety Toolkit - for manufacturing

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